Das Hochschulteam der Bundesagentur für Arbeit Heidelberg bietet umfassend Beratung für Studierenden und Absolventen sowie Absolventinnen rund um Arbeitsmarkt und Berufseinstieg.

Das Semesterprogramm für das WS 2018/19 finden Sie hier.

Weitere Informationen entnehmen Sie bitte der Homepage der Agentur für Arbeit: Link

Speaker: Professor Dr. Kai Johnsson, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Dept. of Chemical Biology, Heidelberg
Title: Artificial Sensor Proteins for Applications in Basic Research and Medicine, Presentation in English
Date: Monday, 17 September 2018, 11:00 a.m.
Location: Carl-Bosch-Auditorium, Studio Villa Bosch, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 33, 69118 Heidelberg (Studio entrance between Villa Bosch and HITS)
Parking: Parking garage "Unter der Boschwiese" (free of charge)

Abstract:
Monitoring drug or metabolite concentrations at the point-of-care could improve the diagnosis and management of numerous diseases. Yet for most medically relevant molecules, such assays are not available. Using a combination of synthetic chemistry and protein engineering, we have generated light-emitting sensor proteins for use in paper-based assays. The analyte induces a change in the color of the emitted light, enabling its quantification using a digital camera. The approach makes numerous medically relevant molecules candidates for quantitative point-of-care assays, as shown for the anti-cancer drug methotrexate. Methotrexate serum levels were analyzed at the point-of-care within minutes using only minute amounts of sample. The approach should be important for the diagnosis and management of numerous diseases and furthermore underlines how the synergy between synthetic chemistry and protein engineering can be exploited to create artificial biomolecules with highly unusual properties.
Kai Johnsson is Director at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Department of Chemical Biology since 2017. He was appointed after being Full Professor at the Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL). His current research interests focus on the development of chemical approaches to visualize and manipulate biochemical activities in living cells. His past achievements include the introduction of methods to specifically label proteins in living cells (i.e. SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag), the development of new fluorescent probes and sensors as well as studies on the mechanism of action of drugs and drug candidates.
Kai Johnsson is Associate Editor of ACS Chemical Biology since 2005. He is member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Science and of the Research Council of the Swiss National Science Foundation. He received the Prix APLE for the invention of the year 2003 of EPFL, the Novartis Lectureship Award 2012/13, the Karl-Heinz Beckurts Prize 2016 and is elected member of EMBO.

Contact:
Benedicta Frech (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., phone: 06221-533-263)

Speaker: Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Garching

Title: Measuring the Expansion Rate of the Universe: Is ´Hubble´s constant´constant? (Presentation in English)
Date: Monday, 23 April 2018, 11:00 a.m.
Location: Carl-Bosch-Auditorium, Studio Villa Bosch, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 33, 69118 Heidelberg (Studio entrance between Villa Bosch and HITS)
Parking: Parking garage "Unter der Boschwiese" (free of charge)

Abstract:
Although systematic uncertainties may limit the accuracy of thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, they are at present the best tools to determine relative distances in the Universe. However, an extremely important question is: Can we determine accurate absolute distances also, reflected in the uncertainty of today’s expansion rate of the Universe, the Hubble constant H0. In fact, the present 5% discrepancy in H0 determinations between the cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernovae either points at additional cosmological components or errors in the measurements, and this uncertainty on H0 is a severe limitation on an accurate determination of most other cosmological parameters. In this talk we will discuss several promising ways to obtain high-precision measurements of H0 in the near future.

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Hillebrandt is retired director of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA) in Garching and Honorary Professor of Theoretical Physics at the Technical University of Munich since 1990. He obtained his doctoral degree from the University of Cologne in 1973, from where he moved to the Technical University in Darmstadt. In 1977 after his habilitation, he accepted an offer from the MPA and moved to Munich in 1978. In 1985 he became a Scientific Member of the MPA, and in 1997 a member of its Board of Directors. Honorary positions include the Chairmanship of the Astronomische Gesellschaft (1990-1993). His research is focused on various fields of theoretical astrophysics, such as nuclear and particle astrophysics, stellar structure and evolution, and, in particular, the final stages of stellar evolution. His research tools are mainly numerical simulations performed on supercomputers.

Contact:
Benedicta Frech (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., phone: 06221-533-263)

Speaker: Prof. Dr. Sergei L. Kosakovsky Pond, Temple University, Dep. of Biology, Philadelphia, USA

Title: Beyond software tuning: scaling up comparative coding sequence analysis using approximations and models that adapt their complexity to the data (Presentation in English)
Date: Monday, 28 May 2018, 11:00 a.m.
Location: Carl-Bosch-Auditorium, Studio Villa Bosch, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 33, 69118 Heidelberg (Studio entrance between Villa Bosch and HITS)
Parking: Parking garage "Unter der Boschwiese" (free of charge)

Abstract:
Genetic sequence data are being generated at an ever-increasing pace, while many analytical techniques that are commonly used to make biologically meaningful infer-ences on these data are still “stuck” in the “small data” age. For example, a practical upper bound on the number of sequences that can be analyzed with many popular comparative phylogenetic methods is 1000, especially if codon-substitution models are used. These types of models are an essential tool for deciphering the action of natural selection on genetic sequences, and have been used extensively in biomedical and basic science applications, for example to quantify pathogen evolution: drug re-sistance, zoonotic adaptation, immune escape.

We show how his number can be raised by several orders of magnitude, enabling in-depth study of gene-sized alignments with 10000 – 100000 sequences, much more extensive model testing, or the implementation of more realistic models with added complexity. This can be accomplished via an adaptation of machine learning tech-niques originally developed in the context of large-scale data mining (latent Dirichlet allocation models), and for variable selection.

Specifically, we describe a relatively general approximation technique to limit the num-ber of expensive likelihood function evaluations a priori, by discretizing a part of the parameter space to a fixed grid, estimating other parameters using much faster sim-pler models, and integrating over the grid using MCMC or a variational Bayes ap-proach. We demonstrate how this technique can achieve 100× or greater speedups for detecting sites subject to positive selection, while improving statistical performance. Other analyses where there are only a 2-3 parameters of interest (e.g. detection of directional selection in protein sequences) can be accommodated. When discretization is not appropriate, it is often possible to develop methods that employ variable para-metric complexity chosen with an information theoretic criterion. For example, in the Adaptive Branch Site Random Effects model, we quickly select and apply models of different complexity to different branches in the phylogeny, and deliver statistical per-formance matching or exceeding best-in-class existing approaches, while running an order of magnitude faster.

Curriculum vitae: Please see: http://spond.github.io/CV.js/cv.html

Contact: Benedicta Frech (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., phone: 06221-533-263)

Am Freitag, den 17. November 2017, um 20:00 Uhr findet der Vortrag „Die Kunst der Bewegung – Von Exo-Skeletten und humanoiden Robotern“ von Prof. Dr. Katja Mombaur im Rahmen des „International Science Festival – Geist Heidelberg“ im DAI Heidelbrg statt. Frau Prof. Mombaur untersucht mit ihrer Arbeitsgruppe an der Universität Heidelberg menschliche Bewegungen im Alltag und beim Sport. Elementar dafür sind Bewegungsmessungen am Menschen selbst, mathematische Modelle und Simulationen am Computer. Eines von Frau Mombaur Zielen ist, Exo-Skelette zu entwickeln, die beim Laufen helfen oder die Wirbelsäule entlasten. Außerdem leitet Frau Mombaur das Heidelberg Center for Motion Research, an dem sich Natur- und Geisteswissenschaftler gemeinsam u. a. mit der Verbindung von Bewegung, Psyche, Kognition und Körper beschäftigen.

Der Eintritt beträgt im Vorverkauf 8 Euro, ermäßigt 5 Euro.

Mehr Informationen erhalten Sie auch unter https://dai-heidelberg.de/de/veranstaltungen/katja-mombaur-joerg-troeger-17049/.

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